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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in eczema
Understanding and Treating Psoriasis and Eczema

Psoriasis and eczema are two common skin conditions frequently discussed in the skincare industry. Since the treatments for both of them are very similar, they seem to get linked together and talked about interchangeably. Even though psoriasis and eczema may have some similar remedies they are very different skin conditions. Knowing the difference between them will help further understand the best healings for both. Lemongrass Spa Products provides a variety of products that can help alleviate symptoms of both conditions.

Eczema, also known as atopic dermatitis, is a hypersensitivity of the skin. This is strictly a topical condition. It is most common in babies as they are building their immune system and is a condition that is typically grown out of. However, there are certain cases where this sensitivity continues into adulthood. Certain dyes, fabrics, soaps and other allergies such as pets can trigger eczema. The skin may look red, inflamed, cracked, peeling or blistered. Since eczema is a form of skin irritation, it causes the skin to be extremely itchy; most treatments focus on soothing this extreme discomfort. When the dryness and itchiness are taken care of, the skin begins to heal. The best Lemongrass Spa product recommended for eczema would be Healing Elements Balm. The zinc oxide used in Healing Elements is extremely soothing and will help the itching and prevent further damage to the skin. Another recommendation to soothe eczema is to eliminate body care products that contain fragrance and limit the amount of ingredients in the products that you use. Lemongrass Spa Products provides a variety of fragrance-free products such as Unscented Body Icing and Unscented Prebiotic Hand Wash. If choosing to use essential oils, make sure they are extremely diluted and used in a base such as a balm or oil.

Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune disorder that causes an overproduction of skin cells. Unlike eczema, this condition is triggered from inside the body. Psoriasis shares a lot of the same symptoms as eczema, however the main difference is the build up of white flaky cells that will appear on the skin that does not happen with eczema. At this current time there is no cure for psoriasis, but there have been some successful treatments. Because this condition is internal the best treatments for it are diet, stress control and prescriptions prescribed by your doctor. People have been extremely successful at keeping their condition under control with those three remedies. Using products that gently exfoliate the area to remove the cell build up along with treating the “soreness” of the skin that is often described by people who have this condition are helpful in treating psoriasis. After gently exfoliating the skin apply Lemongrass Spa’s Ultra Hydrating Body Crème to keep the new skin moisturized and soothed. Also using one of Lemongrass Spa’s balms such as the Peppermint Foot Balm can help ease the topical discomfort. Spraying Lemongrass’s Prebiotic Facial Mist on the area will help feed the good bacteria on the skin and keep it healthy as it heals.

Using the right skincare products on eczema and psoriasis play a huge role in helping them heal. Most of Lemongrass Spa’s products are safe to use on these conditions. When recommending products, stick with fragrance-free and a short ingredient list; this lessens the chance of any adverse reactions. Now having a better understanding of each condition, you can find the right products to sooth the irritation caused by these conditions.

Let me know in the comments what's helped provide relief for your psoirasis or eczema syptoms.

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What is the Difference Between Prebiotic Skincare and Traditional Skincare?

During the skincare roundtable expo held at this year’s Lemongrass Spa Products Convention we addressed a myriad of questions. One of the most popular discussions centered around the use of Prebiotics versus Traditional skincare; both of which Lemongrass Spa offers to customers. The difference between the two is significant and boils down to the philosophy and approach in how skin is treated. This article details those philosophies and who benefits the most from each one.

The traditional three-step skincare regime has been around for a long time. Cleanse, tone and moisturize was and still is taught as the best way to take care of your skin. Alkaline cleansers would remove the dirt and oil from the skin, acidic toners would bring the skin back to its normal pH and moisturizers would replenish all the hydration that was lost during the cleansing and toning process. Since skincare is ever evolving, most companies have replaced their harsh cleansers with pH balanced ones, eliminating the need for toners and replacing them with facial mists followed by serums, concentrates and anti-aging moisturizers. I know women who perform an elaborate seven-step skin care routine every night before bed and swear by it. The results they receive are beautiful healthy skin, so it would be hard to convince them to change their routine. Since the three-step skincare routine is the most widely excepted way skincare has been taught, most women are equipped with this basic knowledge. It might be a little hard to for some to feel their skincare needs are being met with only using two facial products that feed the good bacteria on the skin, and that is ok. I always asked my clients two questions: what is your current skincare routine, and what are your skincare goals. If their answer to the first question is anything with a three-step skincare regime or higher I would introduce them to our traditional skincare line and then look at their skincare goals to chose the specific products. Unless you are wanting to reduce skincare steps, time or ingredients, I would recommend the traditional method. I would also recommend this method to women that are highly into anti-aging products and ingredients.

Prebiotics are fairly new in skincare, but as we learn more about the skin biome, prebiotics are becoming more popular and are starting to show up in mainstream products. Most people are aware of the benefits of probiotics. Probiotics are good bacteria that you take to help aid in digestion and keep the balance of good and bad bacteria in the gut. Since probiotics put good bacteria into the body it can also help clear certain skin conditions that are caused by an imbalanced diet. You want to keep the good bacteria healthy in your body in order to help fight off certain digestive and skin issues and that is where prebiotics come in. Prebiotics are food for the good bacteria. When you are providing good bacteria the proper nutrients, it thrives and keeps the bad bacteria in check. So when you incorporate ingredients like sea kelp and coconut oil (used in our prebiotic line) they feed the good bacteria on the skin. When you use any of our prebiotic cleansers (Prebiotic Facial Wash and Prebiotic Body Wash) you are not cleansing away both good and bad bacteria, but simply feeding the good bacteria. This method can help with so many skin conditions that are caused by a bacterial imbalance. Acne, rosacea, eczema, sensitive are just a few of the skin conditions that really benefit from prebiotics. If you are looking to heal these certain skin conditions and are willing to try something new, then the prebiotic line would be the way to go. The prebiotic line is also great for people who do not have a skincare routine and want something simple to start with, looking to save money (there are only two products to buy), looking for a minimal ingredient list (there are only 6 or 7 ingredients in both washes) and simply someone who does not have a lot of time to spend on a skincare routine.           

With the knowledge of how both types are skincare work, you are able to decide which way is best for. As more innovated methods are developed education is key to helping you meet your skincare needs.

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Ingredient Spotlight: Evening Primrose Oil

A bright yellow North American wildflower, evening primrose’s name comes from the plant’s blooming in the evenings. This common wildflower was a dietary and medicinal staple in Native American cultures. The stems and roots were cooked and eaten while parts of the plant were used in medicinal treatments from wound compresses to tinctures and teas for a variety of ailments including digestive and menstrual issues. Renowned for it’s skin-rejuvenating quality, evening primrose oil has become a natural skin care star.

Evening primrose oil is cold pressed from the seeds of the Evening Primrose plant. The oil is comprised of omega-6 essential fatty acids Linolenic and Gamma Linolenic and omega-3 and omega-9 fatty acids Oleic, Palmitic and Stearic. Omega-6 fatty acids are important structural components of cell membranes but are not produced by the body, and evening primrose oil contains one of the highest concentrations of Linolenic Acid in the family of natural oils with concentrations typically between 55-72%. Fatty acids are integral to maintain the structural integrity of the skin, which reduces the signs of aging, and topical application has been found to be as effective for the skin healthy as oral supplements.

Antioxidants vitamin E and vitamin C are also packed into this golden oil; they help protect skin against environmental stressors and oxidation, which causes fine lines, wrinkles and other signs of aging. Evening primrose oil’s anti-inflammatory properties have made it an essential ingredient in creams and lotions to help soothe dryness, itchiness and redness associated with skin conditions such as acne, eczema and psoriasis. Evening primrose oil is also considered to help those suffering from hormonal acne. The oil absorbs into the skin quickly, reduces transepidermal water loss and is considered hypoallergenic because skin irritation is rare.

Lemongrass Spa harnesses the benefits of evening primrose oil in a variety of products. For anti-aging benefits try Gentle Face Crème, Face Crème with Botanicals, Tea Tree Face Crème or Organic Anti Aging Serum. For all your moisturizing needs choose from Whipped Body Butter, Hand & Body LotionHand & Body Lotion and Ultra Hydrating Body Crème.

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Posted by on in Natural Ingredients
4 Uses for Mango Butter

Mango butter is traditionally used in tropical regions to moisturize and heal skin but has found its way into Western skin care treatments. This fast absorbing, non-greasy fat is lightly scented, off-white in color and a solid at room temperature. Mango butter is extracted from the pulp of the mango seed, which is rich in oleic and stearic acids and omega-9. It is similar to cocoa butter with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-aging and antiseptic properties.

Mango butter is often used in wound care due to its ability to regenerate skin. In a study performed to test the effectiveness of mango butter on wound healing, specifically cracked skin, results demonstrated mango butter to completely repair skin and predominantly be “antiseptic, healing, soothing and cooling in most of the clinical subjects” as well as “actively replenish[ing] moisture, leaving the skin looking silky smooth and hydrated.”

Dry Skin

Mango butter increases hydration and is presumed to prevent drying of skin by reducing water loss from the epidermis. It’s used to treat dryness caused by eczema and psoriasis plus itchiness from rashes and bug bites.

Products to try: Almond or Mandarin Orange Body Polish, Nourishing Lip Butter and Ultra Hydrating Body Crème

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Olive Oil: From Dinner Table to Beauty Counter

Olive oil’s lush history is as deep and rich as the golden hued substance itself. Native to Mediterranean countries, ancient cultures used olive oil for a variety of every day purposes such as food, fuel, beauty and possibly currency, and evidence suggests production began over 5,000 years ago. Revered for its health benefits, olive oil is the number one recommended fat for cooking and is now a staple of modern kitchens, but olive oil’s health benefits don’t stop with food. Olive oil is used to maintain the health of skin, nails and hair.

Moisturizer

Dry skin leads to redness, flaking and cracking, especially in dry climates. Olive oil’s ability to penetrate deep into the skin to deliver nutrients and hydration restores skin’s suppleness. Olive oil paired with a gentle exfoliant like sea salt or sugar also helps renew skin’s natural glow by removing dead cells without stripping skin of its natural oils.

Recommended products: Organic Skin & Nail Balm, Almond Body Polish, Lavender Mint Body Polish, Men’s Essentials Shaving Crème

Antioxidant

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Ingredient Spotlight: Coconut Oil

The coconut fruit has provided meat, water, milk and oil to tropical communities for thousands of years and has been deemed “The Tree of Life” by Asian and Pacific islanders for its extensive dietary and medicinal applications. Mentions of the medicinal benefits of the coconut can be found in ancient Sanskrit text, and coconut oil is used in Ayurvedic medicine, an alternative healing process from India estimated to be 5000 years old. Traditional medicinal applications of coconut oil include fevers, nausea, rashes, toothaches, ulcers, colds, lice, bruises and more. 

At the end of World War II, coconut oil was found in the United States in the form of margarine, but it soon fell out of favor as a household staple due studies concluding all saturated fats increased cholesterol and risk for heart disease. It is now believed coconut’s unique combination of short and medium chained fatty acids, primarily lauric acid and myristic acid, precludes it from negatively impacting health.

Coconut oil isn’t just for cooking or alternative medicine; it’s one of the most widely used natural oils in personal care. Coconut oil is touted for its ability to do everything from repairing damaged hair to reducing wrinkles to blocking UV rays. Where there is little clinical evidence of coconut oil being a beauty miracle, there is plenty of antidotal evidence coconut oil is a master moisturizer and potent antioxidant.

Coconut oil is pressed from the seeds of the coconut palm tree and is comprised of fatty acids including lauric, linoleic, myristic, oleic, caprylic, capric, stearic and palmitric. Studies on the skin care benefits of these fatty acids lead skin care experts to believe coconut oil isn’t all hype. For example, lauric acid and caprylic acid could both be effective in fighting acne due to antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. Vitamin E and vitamin D, potent antioxidants that protects skin from free radical damage, joins this fatty acid super group. Coconut oil penetrates the skin, making it the perfect vehicle to deliver the benefits of other natural oils and botanical extracts.

Nourish your body from head to toe with coconut oil by trying a few of these exfoliating, moisturizing and cleansing products:

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Posted by on in Natural Ingredients

sheabutter.jpg

Used for centuries in Africa to moisturize and protect skin from the harsh elements, “shea butter is the skin’s best friend,” according to the American Shea Butter Institute. The shea tree (Butyrospermum parkii), nicknamed “The Tree of Life” because every part of the tree is used as a natural health remedy, produces mango-sized green fruits, the nuts (seeds) from which shea butter is extracted. Shea butter has been studied for its chemical makeup and is a favorite in natural skin and hair care.

These are some of shea butter’s nutrient benefits:

  • Vitamin A aids in skin protection and healing
  • Vitamin D promotes skin cell growth 
  • Vitamin E, a powerful antioxidant, protects against sun and free radical damage and slows the signs of aging
  • Essential fatty acids to help with skin cell renewal and acts as a skin protector, soothing dry chapped skin

Shea butter is renowned for its emollient and anti-inflammatory properties to sooth minor skin conditions such as sun burns, small wounds, eczema, allergies, blemishes, cracks and bruises. Shea butter can decrease the amount of moisture loss in skin and hair and stimulate collagen production to strengthen skin. It is said the moisturizers present in shea butter are also some of the same moisturizers produced by skin’s sebaceous glands, making it suitable for all skin types. As an added bonus, shea butter could have sunscreen properties (up to SPF 6) due to naturally occurring cinnamic acid.

For softer, smoother looking skin and hair, choose products enhanced with shea butter*, like some of our Lemongrass Spa Products’ favorites. Your skin and hair will thank you!

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Ingredient Spotlight: Jojoba Oil

Pressed from seeds of the scrub Simmondsiachinensis and used for centuries to treat wounds, jojoba [pronounced hoh-hoh-buhoil stars in skincare products due to its numerous benefits. Comprised of fatty acids and fatty alcohols, this golden liquid isn’t oil at all but a liquid wax, and is loaded with vitamin E, vitamin B complex, vitamin C, myristic acid, iodine and the minerals silicon, chromium, copper and zinc.

Revered in folk medicine for its skin healing properties, studies on jojoba oil, as with many natural skincare ingredients, have only recently begun. A preliminary study on the effects of jojoba oil on mild acne, in which participants used a clay and jojoba oil mask, showed an average of 54% acne reduction, and jojoba was found to help speed the closure of wounds according to a 2011 study published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology. Inflammation can be blamed for skin conditions such as eczema and acne, and a 2005 study concluded jojoba could help reduce inflammation. Results of these studies confirm why natural skincare manufacturers choose to use this ancient oil.

These are just some of the reasons to use jojoba oil:

  • Suitable for all skin types
  • Quick absorbing with no greasy residue
  • Antibacterial & anti-inflammatory for soothing dry, itchy skin
  • Increases hydration to skin
  • Improves skin’s suppleness
  • Fights the signs of aging due to high levels of antioxidants Vitamin E and Vitamin C
  • Calms and heals sunburnt skin
  • Removes buildup on hair follicles which can help reduce dandruff

Reap jojoba oil’s nourishing benefits by trying our now famous seasonal favorites such as Frosted Cranberry Hand & Body Soap, Perfectly Pumpkin Body Polish and Candy Cane Hand & Body Lotion. Or pamper your skin all year long with the #1 selling Healing Elements Balm, chapped skin savior Ultra Hydrating Body Crème and creamy new Men’s Essentials Shaving Crème, just to name a few.

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